Answers To Your Workers' Compensation Questions

Below are answers to frequently asked questions about the Minnesota workers' compensation system.

I have more than 30 years of experience representing injured people from throughout the north metro area of the Twin Cities and from outstate Minnesota. For legal advice about your claim or situation, please call me, attorney James Nethercut, at 612-504-5763 to schedule a free consultation.

What does workers' compensation cover?

Your workers' compensation benefits should cover your medical expenses related to your work injury and most lost wages. You should also be compensated for any permanent physical damage related to your injury. If your injury prevents you from returning to your job, workers' compensation benefits should also cover vocational rehabilitation. The Workers' Compensation Act also provides death benefits to surviving family members if someone dies as a result of a work-related illness or injury.

What if I'm not a full-time employee? Can I still get workers' comp?

Yes. However, independent contractors are often not covered by workers' compensation policies. Often, however, independent contractors, to their surprise, find out that they are not actually independent contractors, but rather are employees under the Workers' Compensation Act. Therefore, it is always beneficial to contact an attorney.

How long do I have to report an injury?

You should always report your injury in writing as soon as it becomes known. If you have an injury and wait longer than six months before reporting it, your employer will argue that your claim should be barred due to lack of notice on your part. Consequently, it is always best to report the injury as soon as possible. Please keep in mind that this is not the length of time you have to file a claim. This simply pertains to notice to your employer of your work-related injury.

Do I have to prove that my injury or illness was someone's fault to get workers' comp?

No. The workers' compensation system is set up to provide compensation for any injury that happens in the course of your work. The most important thing to prove in workers' compensation claims is that your injury is related to your job, not that someone else caused it. If you are concerned with holding someone responsible for your injury, however, you may wish to consult a lawyer about your options for a personal injury claim instead.

Have More Questions About Workers' Compensation?

Speak with an experienced workers' compensation attorney for answers to your specific questions. To schedule a free consultation, send us an email today or call 612-504-5763.